Lamb Prices

Current Lamb Market:

Last Updated: Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Lamb and Ewe prices remain in line with average

Recent industry commentary for the sheep industry has largely been focused around the ‘flying’ demand for store lambs and cull ewes. Industry sentiment from farmers appears to be largely optimistic, although prices remain at or around the five-year average.

Finished prices, especially in the past six weeks, have remained around the average for the time of year. Cull prices, had been marginally down on the five-year average, but have held their price since the end of June at a time when prices normally start to fall, and as a result are currently above the average and are well up on the previous year’s level. Store prices have been marginally above average, and last year.

STORE LAMB FOCUS

Throughputs of store lambs sold at England and Wales auction markets are well up on the year, with average prices also slightly up. Reports suggest all keep lengths are attracting demand. Currently, the GB average NSL store lamb price is trending around £56/head mark.

The optimistic comments are particularly reflected in store lamb prices. With the end of October now three months away any long keep store lambs will be sold post-Brexit.

Finished prices are normally much more predictable during September and October than earlier in the year. However, this year could be the exception with key announcements around the future cost of doing business with the EU potentially being made, i.e. will there be tariffs?

Rebecca Oborne

AHDB

Head
Neck
Neck When cut into thick slices this bony part of the neck ( know sometimes as Scrag End) it is very tasty and good for slow cooking. Also from this section are Neck Fillets – the same muscles but taken off the bone. Stew or braise until tender. Both these cuts are often underrated and as a result inexpensive. View Meat Cut
Chuck
Chuck Lamb chops or cutlets are the most expensive cuts of lamb, but are incredibly delicious and tender. They are taken from the ribs of the lamb and cooked individually, normally over a grill or a barbecue. When a number of them are left together and cooked as a whole, they’re called a rack of lamb. Chops and racks can be French trimmed, where the meat is scraped from the ends of the rib bones, which looks super-impressive on a plate. Best served pink, they are amazing roasted and served with crushed potatoes or served lollipop style – perfect for sharing. View Meat Cut
Shoulder
Shoulder Lamb shoulder is usually sold whole or halved on the bone. This part of the animal has worked hard so is better for slow roasting to break down any fibres to be really tender, Shoulder is also sold boned and rolled for roasting or diced for casseroles, curries or stewing. Minced lamb is also taken from this section of the animal. View Meat Cut
Rib
Rib This section produces some of the most tender cuts of Lamb. Best End is the first eight ribs which are known as “The Rack”. The Rack can be cut in several ways. If the ends of the bones are exposed after the fat has been trimmed away it is termed “French Trimmed”. Two racks roasted together with the bones intertwined are known as a “Guard of Honour”. View Meat Cut
Breast
Breast This is the belly area of the Lamb. This is usually sold as a rolled joint for roasting. It is a quite fatty cut but when slow cooked this melts away to leave a tender and very tasty meat. This is one of the best value, least expensive cuts. View Meat Cut
Loin
Loin This portion provides Loin Chops for grilling or frying, similarly a Barnsley Chop – which is double the size being both sides of the animal. Off the bone this section provides Noisettes or in one piece a Cannon. These are all very tender and will cook quickly. The whole loin, both sides of the Lamb roasted as a piece, is a very splendid joint known as a Saddle of Lamb this is a large joint for 8 or 10 people. View Meat Cut
Tenderloin
Tenderloin Loin of lamb comes from the middle-lower section of the rear quarter. The loin is usually divided into loin chops and lamb tenderloin. A lamb loin can be boned, rolled and tied, or cut into loin chops. This jewel of the lamb is very tender, and cooking time should be minimal. View Meat Cut
Flank
Flank The loin primal cut is the section along the lamb's back from the 13th rib to the hip. It also includes the flank, or belly section, which is much tougher than the loin section. View Meat Cut
Leg
leg
Leg Whole, half or boned Leg of Lamb will make a perfect roast. For grilling and frying or the BBQ Leg of lamb is often sold as Leg Steaks, stir fry strips, or cubed for kebabs. A leg of lamb that has been ‘Butterflied”’ is a boned leg opened up into a large flat piece which has a rough butterfly shape. This too can be roasted or grilled. View Meat Cut
leg2
Leg Whole, half or boned Leg of Lamb will make a perfect roast. For grilling and frying or the BBQ Leg of lamb is often sold as Leg Steaks, stir fry strips, or cubed for kebabs. A leg of lamb that has been ‘Butterflied”’ is a boned leg opened up into a large flat piece which has a rough butterfly shape. This too can be roasted or grilled. View Meat Cut
leg3
Leg Whole, half or boned Leg of Lamb will make a perfect roast. For grilling and frying or the BBQ Leg of lamb is often sold as Leg Steaks, stir fry strips, or cubed for kebabs. A leg of lamb that has been ‘Butterflied”’ is a boned leg opened up into a large flat piece which has a rough butterfly shape. This too can be roasted or grilled. View Meat Cut
leg4
Leg Whole, half or boned Leg of Lamb will make a perfect roast. For grilling and frying or the BBQ Leg of lamb is often sold as Leg Steaks, stir fry strips, or cubed for kebabs. A leg of lamb that has been ‘Butterflied”’ is a boned leg opened up into a large flat piece which has a rough butterfly shape. This too can be roasted or grilled. View Meat Cut