Search:
0 items - £0.00 | 01323 87323 Login / Sign up

Pork Prices

Current Pork Market:

Last Updated: Tuesday, September 25, 2018

PIG PRICES (UK SPEC)

 

During the week ended 15 September pig prices continued on their downward trajectory of late. The UK spec SPP fell by 0.27p, to 145.12p/kg. The price is currently 14.30p below last year’s price.

Estimated slaughterings were down around 4,500 head on the previous week to total 172,000 head. Industry reports suggest that supply is currently meeting demand, both of which are somewhat disappointing for the time of year.

The average carcase weight for the SPP sample for the week is 84.39kg. Average carcase weights are lower than last year. This is a consequence of poorer growth rates through the summer, with some producers still need to clear out pens in order to maintain throughputs despite the pigs perhaps not being at their target weight.

In contrast to the SPP, the UK-spec APP rose slightly on the week, up 0.21p in the week ended 8 September, to finish on 148.88p/kg. The current figure is 14.43p lower than year earlier levels. The current price rise has widened the gap to SPP, now measuring a 3.49p difference between the two prices.

AHDB Pork

 

Head
Head You can boil a whole head and pick the cooked meat. It is usually a roasted head that finds its way on to a buffet, but the meat can also be used in soups and stews. Brawn, or head cheese, is a traditional recipe of pig's head set in its own jelly. The idea of preparing and cooking a pig's head might put a lot of people off, but it tends to win in a flavour competition against pork loin and chops. View Meat Cut
Cheek
Cheek Pork cheeks are exactly what the name implies - the slip of meat in the hollow of the cheek, underneath the animal's eyes. This is a cut of meat that is more unknown than underused. The cheek is relatively lean and very moist.
Why eat facial muscle, made tough from a life spent chewing swill, you might be asking. As is the case with cheaper cuts of meat, fast cooking is not suitable, but slow cooked on a low heat for a long time and the meat breaks down into nuggets of fork tender flesh.
View Meat Cut
Shoulder
Shoulder The nearer the head, the sweeter and more succulent the meat. Shoulder is one of the best roasting joints and, if you love crackling, the dry skin and layer of fat is one of the best for this crispy delight.
Pork shoulder is a complex combination of muscles, connective tissues, sinew and fat that extends from the spine to the elbow of the front leg. It is full of flavour, inexpensive and ideal not only for roasting, but also slow cooking and barbecuing.
View Meat Cut
Picnic
Picnic Immediately below the shoulder is the next cut you’re likely to find: the Picnic Ham (occasionally called the picnic shoulder). “Another total misnomer,” says Mylan. “When you hear “ham” you think of the rear leg. But the picnic ham is the lower part of shoulder.” This is another relatively tough and fatty cut, though it is often sold bone-in. View Meat Cut
Hock
Hock The hock is the lower shank of the leg above the foot. With much more meat and fat than in the foot, the meat is tough with a lot of connective tissue. As is generally true of tough meats, long, slow cooking renders tender, rich, smokey meat that is perfect for soups, stews and vegetables. Hocks are best enjoyed when the meat becomes so tender that it nearly falls away from the bone. View Meat Cut
Hock2
Hock The hock is the lower shank of the leg above the foot. With much more meat and fat than in the foot, the meat is tough with a lot of connective tissue. As is generally true of tough meats, long, slow cooking renders tender, rich, smokey meat that is perfect for soups, stews and vegetables. Hocks are best enjoyed when the meat becomes so tender that it nearly falls away from the bone. View Meat Cut
Lard
Lard Above the loin is another section of fatback which can be used for making lard, salt pork, or added to sausage or ground pork. View Meat Cut
Loin
Loin It is not possible to discuss pig and not indulge in the mouth-watering prospect of a traditional English breakfast. Not to forget the role of hens, but immense gratitude goes to the animal that contributes the most to this one of the greatest of pleasures – the Fry Up. It is loin meat that is cured to make back bacon.
Bone-in racks of meat look impressive and that is certainly true of a pork loin roast. Two racks tied together in a circle are a “crown” roast. Loin cuts are high up on the back and are the primary muscles along the spine.
It is a moderately tough cut of pork with a good deal of connective tissue, but roasted properly it is satisfyingly tender and juicy – the prime rib of pork.
View Meat Cut
Tenderloin
Tenderloin Pork tenderloin is the muscle that runs alongside the backbone. It is lean, delicately flavored meat. It is the most tender cut of pork if you are quick-cooking it. It should be trimmed of its tough silverskin before cooking. Tenderloin takes to marinades well and should be quickly cooked on a grill, seared, roasted, or sliced and cooked in stir-fries. Since the meat is lean, be careful not to overcook it. View Meat Cut
Ribs
Ribs Spare ribs come from the belly side of the pig's rib cage, but there is nothing spare about spare ribs. They are a staple of American diners and Chinese cuisine, because properly prepared they are succulently tasty.
The term “spare ribs” is a Middle English corruption (via “sparrib”) of “rippspeer”, a Low German term that referred to a rack of meat being turned on a spit roast.
View Meat Cut
Belly
Belly Pork belly is often made into bacon by dry curing or brining and then smoking. It can also be made into sausage and panchetta. Chefs view pork belly as superior to bacon. The juicy layers of fat make this cut meltingly tender and similar in texture to pork loin. View Meat Cut
Ham
Ham The hind leg is one of the four primal cuts of pork, with the other three being loin, shoulder and belly. You can have leg joints, steaks, escallops and diced meat for kebabs, but the vast majority of legs of pork go for curing to make hams. Mmm...ham and mustard sandwiches. Cooked ham is incredibly versatile, is eaten cold frequently and at its highest price is called Prosciutto. View Meat Cut
Hock3
Hock The hock is the lower shank of the leg above the foot. With much more meat and fat than in the foot, the meat is tough with a lot of connective tissue. As is generally true of tough meats, long, slow cooking renders tender, rich, smokey meat that is perfect for soups, stews and vegetables. Hocks are best enjoyed when the meat becomes so tender that it nearly falls away from the bone. View Meat Cut
Hock4
Hock The hock is the lower shank of the leg above the foot. With much more meat and fat than in the foot, the meat is tough with a lot of connective tissue. As is generally true of tough meats, long, slow cooking renders tender, rich, smokey meat that is perfect for soups, stews and vegetables. Hocks are best enjoyed when the meat becomes so tender that it nearly falls away from the bone. View Meat Cut